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Impotency & Viagra

Prostate Cancer Awareness Week (pcaw.org) has compiled information on Impotency & Viagra.

 Impotency and Viagra

What is Viagra used for?


Impotency and Viagra


Background and information on alternatives to Viagra

The penis is a vascular organ which requires exercise. A healthy male will normally experience 3 to 4 erections during their sleep which may last a hour or more each. They are a normal body function whose purpose is to oxygenate the penile erectile tissue. Its inability to achieve and maintain an erection suitable for vaginal intercourse is called "male erectile dysfunction" (ED) or impotency, for short. Impotency affects over 30 million men and their partners. To some men impotency is a symbol of the loss of their manhood, and can be critical to a man’s ego and self-image. And often, because of this, some men are afraid to seek help. And, often when he does, the physician feels uncomfortable or is unable to help because many aren’t aware of the options. If the truth were known, however, virtually 100% of impotency problems can be successfully diagnosed and treated, whether physical or emotional, unless there is permanent injury or severance of the nerves and or vascular supply necessary in the erectile process.

The appropriate treatment for impotence depends upon whether the cause is physical or psychological. A man whose impotence is psychologically based generally still has erections during sleep, whereas an individual whose impotence is physical in origin usually does to. One easy, inexpensive way to test for nocturnal erections is with postage stamps. Glue a strip of stamps around the shaft of the penis before going to bed. If the ring of stamps is broken in the morning, the cause of the impotence is likely psychological. If the strip is unbroken, the impotence is likely physiological. You can also purchase a kit called Snap Gauge from UroHealth Corporation. This test is designed to detect the measure the rigidity of erections experienced during sleep. Call 800.328.1103 for more information.

Considerations:

Recommendations:

Summary:

This will give you some background on the subject. Circumcised men, it is said, have a much higher rate of impotency than uncircumcised men. This will be examined as a separate subject and the information will be presented soon. The important thing to remember is "Don’t wait." The longer you wait, the greater the worry, the more difficult the treatment and recovery, and you’ll miss out on a lot of great evenings in bed, too. So, find a qualified doctor who is knowledgeable of the latest medical therapies. If you need help in locating someone, one of the following organizations can help: Impotence Institute of America & Impotence Anonymous - 1.800.669.1603 or Male Potency Centers of America - 1.800.438.7683. The Institute also offers anonymous groups where men can hear the experiences of other men which usually relates to what they are going through. And, there is an excellent tape discussing all of the causes of impotence, diagnostic treatment options and therapies by Dr. Aubrey Pilgrim for $15 + shipping by calling 1.714.644.7200.

Viagra: Time to Separate Reality from Hype

When Viagra-the first pill to conquer male impotence-was approved earlier this year, doctors couldn't keep up with their patients' demands for prescriptions. All the brou-ha-ha is easy to understand. If normal sexual function can be restored by simply swallowing a little pill, why bother with devices, injections or implants? Still, the wonder drug that can has its limits. And reports of deaths among men taking the sex pill is causing some alarm.

Viagra seemed to burst on the scene out of the blue, but it does have a track record. Sildenafil citrate, the active ingredient in Viagra, was originally developed to treat high blood pressure. It didn't work for that disorder, but in 1993, Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, the drug's manufacturer, started clinical trails of Viagra involving more than 3,000 men with varying degrees of impotence associated with diabetes, spinal cord injury, history of prostate surgery, and other illnesses. The results: 48 percent of men with severe impotence were almost always able to get aroused when using Viagra, and 70 percent of men with milder problems had success using the pill. Men with diabetes or radical prostate surgery had somewhat less improvement than did other groups.

One of the little love pill's major assets is that men who take it get turned on "naturally." That is, Viagra does not directly cause erections as do other impotence treatments. Rather it affects a man's response to sexual stimulation. Taken one hour before sexual activity, the drug acts by enhancing the effects of a chemical the body normally releases into the penis when sexually aroused. This increases blood flow into the penis, which results in an erection. (Viagra should not be taken more than once a day.)

On the down side, there have been reports of deaths and severe side-effects in some men taking Viagra. Men with a history of heart trouble, heart attacks, and low blood pressure should be examined carefully before getting a prescription for the drug, and heart patients taking nitroglycerin or other nitrate-based drugs must not take Viagra because the mix may cause a deadly dip in blood pressure. Other adverse effects of Viagra may include headache, flushing, indigestion, and temporary changes in vision -- including seeing a 'blue haze.' Opthalmologists are concerned that the long-term effects of Viagra on vision are not yet known. Men with sickle cell anemia, leukemia, or multiple myeloma should also avoid Viagra because it is feared that they may develop priapism -- a persistent, painful erection that can permanently damage the penis. Additionally, men are cautioned against using other treatments for impotence while taking Viagra as such combinations have not been tested yet.

Despite problems linked to the sex pill, enthusiasm for it among patients and doctors is still riding high. But men are cautioned to use common sense. They should not take it before having a thorough medical history, including a review of medications, and a physical examination. Viagra is a drug with potentially serious health consequences and is meant only for men diagnosed with impotence. It is not a novelty item for men who achieve normal erections and simply want to heighten their sexual prowess.

Sources

American Foundation for Urologic Disease, Provides free information on impotence and how to assess treatment options. 800.242.2383

Impotence Information Center Provides free literature on impotence. 800.843.4315

National Kidney & Urologic Disease Clearinghouse Offers free literature on a number of urological problems, including impotence. 800.669.1603

Impotence Institute of America, Offers literature on impotence and doctor referrals for a $3.00 shipping charge. 800.669.1603

Health Pages. Publication: Impotence: Causes and Solutions. 1998. www.thehealthpages.com/articles/ar-impot.html

What is Viagra used for?


Viagra is used to treat impotence in men. Viagra increases the body’s ability to achieve and maintain an erection during sexual stimulation. Viagra does not protect you from getting sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV.

Who should not take Viagra?

Men who are currently using medicines that contain nitrates, such as nitroglycerin should not use Viagra because taken together they can lower the blood pressure too much. Viagra should not be used by women or children.

General Precautions with Viagra:

You should have a complete medical history and exam to determine the cause of your impotence before taking Viagra.

Men who have medical conditions that may cause a sustained erection such as sickle cell anemia, leukemia or multiple myeloma or who have an abnormally shaped penis may not be able to take Viagra.

There are several medications that are known to interact with Viagra, so be sure to tell your doctor about all medications you are taking including those you can get without a prescription.

Viagra has not been studied with other treatments for impotence, so use in combination with other treatments is not recommended.

How should I take Viagra? Your healthcare provider may prescribe Viagra as one tablet once a day, about 1 hour before sexual activity. However, Viagra may be taken anywhere from 30 minutes to 4 hours before sexual activity.

What are some possible side effects of Viagra? (This list is NOT a complete list of side effects reported with Viagra. Your healthcare provider can discuss with you a more complete list of side effects.)

Viagra is generally well tolerated. If any side effects are experienced, they are usually mild and temporary. The following is a listing of the most common side effects:

For more detailed information on Viagra, ask your healthcare provider.

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